Explanation of Neorealism Theory of International Actors: An Applied Study on Selected Models)

  • Anwar Mohammed Faraj Mahmood University of Sulaimani- College of Political Science
  • Bakhan Ako Najmalddin University of Sulaimani- College of Political Science

Abstract

The field of international relations has been assessed through diverse theoretical framework including realism. Classical realism has been reformed by neorealists for analyzing current actors and interactions in international relations. For neorealists, the most essential characteristic of the international arena is anarchy, which they argue exists because the international system lacks a world government with the capability of making and imposing international law, which in turn makes cooperating among states difficult. Then, competition and conflict can never be avoided in such situation. Thus, states must eventually guarantee their own survival and security.


 


Neorealists describe states as the main actors in international relations and they have a negative view about non-state actors, in particular international and regional organizations; they state that organizations have no capacity to control a states' attitude or to prevent war or at least minimize anarchy in the international politics. Moreover, neorealists emphasize that organizations are ineffective because the agendas they set tend to be controlled by the superpower states, and they are in fact tools for increasing superpower influence. Neorealists support their argument by highlighting many case studies such as the United Nations, the European Union, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and World Trade Organization.

Published
Mar 26, 2020
How to Cite
MAHMOOD, Anwar Mohammed Faraj; NAJMALDDIN, Bakhan Ako. Explanation of Neorealism Theory of International Actors: An Applied Study on Selected Models). Tikrit Journal For Political Science, [S.l.], n. 18, p. 3-36, mar. 2020. ISSN 2312-6639. Available at: <http://tjfps.tu.edu.iq/index.php/poltic/article/view/202>. Date accessed: 27 may 2020. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.25130/poltic.v0i18.202.
Section
Articles